Lucian Blaga: Selected Philosophical Extracts

Edited by R. T. Allen et al.

February 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-293-7
Availability: In stock
$58 £44 €49

After the Editor's General Introduction, the extracts include central elements of Blaga’s metaphysics, general epistemology, philosophies of science, history, religion, language and especially metaphor, the experience of space and time, art, and finally culture which includes all of them, especially the presence in all of ‘style’ and distinctive ways of practising them. All these extracts are linked by his general epistemology, especially his distinction between two types of knowledge: ‘paradisiac’ or Type 1, which is that of everyday awareness and the current methods, concepts and presuppositions of the sciences of nature and humanity, plus mathematics and philosophy, and accumulates in ‘plus knowledge’ and resolves problems in standard ways; and ‘Luciferican’ or Type 2, which opens up the ‘mysteries’ of new realms of reality which do not fit the current methods, concepts and presuppositions, and so results in ‘minus’ knowledge, the awareness that there are things which at the moment we cannot understand. For these ‘mysteries’ new methods, concepts and presuppositions are required, which ‘abyssal’ categories can supply, ones below those we normally employ and may be aware of. It is part of man’s role in the cosmos to reveal such mysteries. They are also linked by Blaga's awareness of historical changes, especially ‘dogmatic aeons’ in which a prevailing framework of categories, etc., guides knowledge and research, and ones in which Type 2 knowledge dominates and new frameworks are eventually created. Each extract has its own Introduction which places it in the context of the rest of his interlinked philosophy. They show how Blaga, with both general themes and concepts and also with particular examples, combines much of the concerns and methods of Analytic and Continental philosophy, and how his historical perspective applied especially to modern times long before anyone spoke of 'postmodernism', and thus as in his lifetime.

Forget Me Not: The Neuroethical Case Against Memory Manipulation

Peter A. DePergola II, University of Massachusetts Medical School; College of Our Lady of the Elms

February 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-364-4
Availability: Forthcoming
$64 £48 €54

The first philosophical monograph on the ethics of memory manipulation (MM), Forget Me Not: The Neuroethical Case Against Memory Manipulation contends that any attempt to directly and intentionally erase episodic memories poses a grave threat to the human condition that cannot be justified within a normative moral calculus. Grounding its thesis in four evidential effects – namely, (i) MM disintegrates autobiographical memory, (ii) the disintegration of autobiographical memory degenerates emotional rationality, (iii) the degeneration of emotional rationality decays narrative identity, and (iv) the decay of narrative identity disables one to seek, identify, and act on the good – DePergola argues that MM cannot be justified as a morally licit practice insofar as it disables one to seek, identify, and act on the good. A landmark achievement in the field of neuroethics, this book is a welcome addition to both the scholarly and professional community in philosophical and clinical bioethics.

The Origins of Liberty: An Essay in Platonic Ontology

Alexander Zistakis

January 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-289-0
Availability: Forthcoming

Unlike the vast majority of existing literature on Plato, the main claim of this book is that Liberty constitutes the central notion and preoccupation of his thought, and that indeed his theory of ideas is a theory of liberty. Plato's thought is at once the thought of liberty and a theory of liberation. What is more, this thought of liberty tends to be all-encompassing in the sense that it makes repeated efforts to find both the ideal liberty and the conditions and possibility of its existence in the so-called real (material and phenomenal) world. Hence the emphasis on ontology as the very grounds of his political philosophy and anthropology, as well as on the structural unity of all three. Furthermore, understood from such a perspective, Platonic philosophy appears as primarily an investigation, articulation and establishment of the relationships between the individual and the collective, a relationship which is taken to be the natural, the original and originary framework for any conception and exercise of human liberty, and especially democratic theory and politics. By treating Plato’s philosophy as a continuous effort to find modes and dimensions of liberation in and through different forms of the relationship between the individual and the collective, our hope is not only to engage in the discussion about the meaning of Platonic ontological-political insights on different grounds, but also to provide a different perspective for the evaluation of its relevance for the central contemporary issues and problems regarding liberty, liberation, democracy and politics in general. This book will be an interesting reading for both undergraduate students and experienced scholars and researchers, as well as for the general public interested in philosophy, classics and political theory.

Towards A New Social Order? Real Democracy, Sustainability & Peace

Patrick Holz

January 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-367-5
Availability: Forthcoming
$64 £47 €54

This contribution argues that a long-established social order has been in place since the first stratified societies in the Near Middle East which unavoidably comes with substantial economic, political and environmental repercussions. Part I of the book dissects the various facets of this order, which is termed the social dominance paradigm, while in Part II a fundamentally different order, the peace paradigm, is introduced. The latter rests on real democracy (in the Athenian sense), sustainability and peace. As such, both paradigms function as vehicles for further analysis and research while the peace paradigm also provides a rough plan for the implementation of transformational change. Typically, political, economic, social, and environmental research seeks to increase specialized knowledge. Here, however, the overall intent is to utilize interdisciplinary evidence and connect the dots between a number defining features within seemingly modern societies. The argument is that these are, in fact, not modern at all but follow an ancient template of power, control, and coordination concentrated in the hands of the few. Potentially, this contribution can function as a trans-disciplinary methodological framework as well as an information hub for researchers in the fields of political and social sciences, history, anthropology, evolutionary biology, organization and peace studies. Practitioners who are interested in fundamental social change may also find the issues raised to be of interest. As such, this book provides a generalist, evidence-based discussion of a multi-disciplinary nature that may pique the interest of both experts and amateurs alike.

Persons, Institutions, and Trust

Essays in Honor of Thomas O. Buford

Edited by James M. McLachlan, Western Carolina University

January 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-093-3
Availability: In stock
$65 £57 €60

The papers presented in this volume honor Thomas O. Buford. Buford is Professor Emeritus in Philosophy at Furman University where he taught for more than forty years. Several of the papers in this volume are from former students. But Professor Buford is also a pre-eminent voice of fourth generation Personalism, and Boston Personalism in particular. Personalism is a school of philosophical and theological thought which holds that the ideas of “person” and “personality” are indispensable to an adequate understanding of all metaphysical and epistemological problems, as well as are keys to an adequate theory of ethical and political human interaction. Most personalists assert that personality is an irreducible fact found in all existence, as well as in all interpretation of the meaning of existence and the truth about experience. Anything that seems to exist impersonally, such as inanimate matter, nevertheless can exist and have meaning only as related to some personal being. The Boston Personalist tradition was inaugurated by Borden Parker Bowne and continued by Edgar S. Brightman, Peter Bertocci, John Lavely, Carol Robb, and Martin Luther King, Jr.

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