Yoruba Philosophy and the Seeds of Enlightenment

Advancing Yoruba Philosophy

Yemi D. Prince

January 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-301-9
Availability: In stock
$61 £50 €58

For upwards of 25 years, Yemi D. Prince (also known as Yemi D. Ogunyemi) has systematically devoted himself to the education, research and reason of Creative Writing and from Creative Writing to Creative Thinking and from Creative Thinking to Yoruba narrative, cultural, folk philosophy. On realizing that Creative Thinking has become his area of focus and interest, he succeeds in cultivating big ideas, combining them with his life-long experiences in the Humanities, transforming them into new ways of writing, thinking or reasoning. (Some of his big ideas have led to the publication of booklets such as Yoruba Idealism, We Should All Be Philosophers, The Artist-Philosophers in Yoruba land, Codes of Morality and Pursuit of Wisdom.) Thus his big ideas have helped him separate Yoruba folk philosophy from Yoruba autochthonous religion. With his love for big ideas, born out of Creative Thinking and Critical Thinking, he has been able to put a new face on Yoruba Philosophy.

Emotions and Education: Promoting Positive Mental Health in Students with Learning Disabilities

Edited by Nicholas D. Young, American International College et al.

January 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-315-6
Availability: In stock
$58 £48 €55

Written by an experienced team of practitioners and scholars, this text attempts to fill the gap in texts that specifically address the needs of Learning Disabilities (LD) students in the socioemotional and mental health domains. By providing a foundational understanding of some of the salient issues facing students with learning disabilities, we hope to empower all of those who are working to ensure their success by providing the particular challenges that LD students and their families may face, and strategies and best practices for building creativity, resiliency, prosocial behavior, and positive mental health. As a practitioner and family-oriented text, this book seeks to offer a truncated review of relevant literature followed by suggestions to guide practice.

And the Loser is: A History of Oscar Oversights

Aubrey Malone

January 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-322-4
Availability: In stock
$60 £46 €51

This is the first book of its kind. Aubrey Malone has gone back to the start of the Oscar ceremonies and discovered that mistakes have been made every year in the choice of what has been deemed “best” in the categories of acting, directing, producing and the subsidiary awards. He has identified all the great stars (Garbo, Montgomery Clift, Peter O’Toole, Barbara Stanwyck, etc.) who never held Oscars in their hands, and also iconic directors like Stanley Kubrick who were never thus honored. Why were some people over-rewarded by the Academy and why did others fall below the radar? The author outlines all of the extraneous factors leading to voting choices, and how Oscar pariahs have often been subsequently (or even posthumously) awarded for the wrong films to make up for omissions in a given year. With both wit and wisdom he has written an “alternative” history of the Oscars that will be required reading for both academics and film buffs alike. It tells the story behind the story. “If there were Oscars for research, Aubrey Malone would be right up there with the best of them.” (Film Ireland)

Memos from a Theatre Lab: Spaces, Relationships, and Immersive Theatre

Nandita Dinesh, UWC-USA

January 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-369-9
Availability: In stock
$56 £41 €47

Drawing from Dinesh’s findings in Memos from a Theatre Lab: Exploring What Immersive Theatre “Does”, this practice-based-research project – second in an envisioned series of Immersive Theatre experiments in Dinesh’s theatre laboratory -- considers the potential impact of pre-existing relationships between actors, spectators, and performance spaces when using immersive theatrical aesthetics toward educational and/or socio-political objectives. Memos from a Theatre Lab: Spaces, Relationships and Immersive Theatre explores the following questions: When audience members do not know the actors outside the milieu of a theatrical performance, does an immersive form hold different implications than if performers and spectators know each other in ‘real life’? When actors and spectators are strangers to each other, are performers more or less likely to judge the responses that are given to them within an immersive scenario? What kinds of immersive situations, especially in Applied Theatre interventions, might benefit from the presence or absence of a pre-existing relationship between performers, audience members, and the spaces in which these experiences occur? In describing the processes involved in: designing such an experiment, crafting the relevant immersive performances, and gathering/ analysing data from actors and spectators, this book puts forward strategies for students, researchers, and practitioners who seek to better understand the form of Immersive Theatre.

The Death Penalty from an African Perspective

Views from Zimbabwean and Nigerian Philosophers

Edited by Jonathan Chimakonam, University of Calabar, Nigeria & University of Pretoria, South Africa and Fainos Mangena, University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe

January 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-375-0
Availability: Available through resellers
$58 £47 €55

This book is about an African philosophical examination of the death penalty debate. In a 21st century world where the notion of human right is primed, this book considers the question of the death penalty in two sub-Saharan African countries namely, Zimbabwe and Nigeria, notorious for their poor human right records. This edited collection comprises of 11 essays from Zimbabwean and Nigerian philosophers. As opinions continue to divide over the retention or abolition of the death penalty, these African philosophers attempt to localise this debate by raising the following questions: What is the meaning of life in the African place? Is it proper to take the human life under any guise at all? Who has the right to take the human life? Can the death penalty be justified on the bases of African cultures? Why should it be abolished? Why should it be retained? Indeed, this book is the first of its kind to engage the tumultuous issue of capital punishment in the postcolonial Africa and from the African philosophical point of view.

EV MDC SSL