Call for Book Chapters: "The Primacy of Indigenous Knowledge"

Vernon Press invites book chapter proposals to be included in a forthcoming scholarly volume on "The Primacy of Indigenous Knowledge."

Certain agricultural practices define specific Indigenous people groups from reindeer herding among the Sámi, potato farming among the Inca, or cultivating the "Three Sisters" (corn, beans, and squash) among the Iroquois. These practices are very much a part of a tribe's identity as other traditions such as dances, writs of passage, and artwork. Agricultural practices are also an important way of life that provides nutrition and cultural connections to the land.

Since the 1970s, the study of Indigenous peoples has grown across many different disciplines, which have produced a number of important works. This book seeks to ask broad questions about Indigenous agricultural history that spans chronologic, geographic, and spatial boundaries, and is interested in compiling a collection of works addressing Indigenous agriculture around the globe. We welcome proposals that are interdisciplinary in nature and can come from disciplines that include archaeology, anthropology, English, ethnohistory, history, literature, sociology, etc. We seek book chapters that range from approximately 5000-6000 words in length to include in this edited collection. 

We invite chapter proposals that explore a wide variety of topics such as:

            - Exploration of contemporary Indigenous agricultural practices.

            - Examination of traditional agricultural practices utilized as a means for modern culture revitalization and/or nation-building.

            - Analysis of historic agricultural practices that shaped and re-shaped climate, ecosystems, environment, flora, fauna, etc. 

            - Study of Indigenous regenerative farming techniques used to address ecological issues such as climate change and sustainability.

            - Evaluation of the use of Indigenous agricultural knowledge as a means of resistance to colonization.

Please send a 300-word abstract, project title, and a brief bio in English to Nick Timmerman (Volume Editor) at: ntimmer@langston.edu by December 1, 2021.

This proposal is due on November 1st 2021.

Page last updated on September 10th 2021. All information correct at the time, but subject to change.

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