Climate Change Perception and Changing Agents in Africa & South Asia

Suiven John Paul Tume, Vincent Itai Tanyanyiwa (Eds.)

by Suiven John Paul Tume (Green Care Association, Cameroon), Misiani M. Zachary (University of Yaounde), John Mutambwa (University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe), Abraham R. Matamanda (University of Free State, South Africa), Njodzeka Gilbert Njodzeka (Green Care Association, Cameroon), Nyuykongadzem Emma Dindze (University of Bamenda, Cameroon), Mbu Dora Nyukighan (Federal University of Lokoja, Nigeria), Moye Eric Kongnso (University of Dschang, Cameroon), Rejoice Madobi (Zimbabwe Open University, Zimbabwe), Takudzwa Leonard Mathende, Tatenda Nhapi, K.C. Anup (Tribhuvan University, Nepal), Lun Yin (Minzu University of China, China), Innocent Chirisa (University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe), Vincent Itai Tanyanyiwa (Zimbabwe Open University, Zimbabwe), Susy Wandera (Sustainable Environmental Development Watch Kenya)

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All the authors did a great job. [...] original and scholarly. It gives opportunities for people in different regions to learn from others about what they are doing in line with climate change, e.g., awareness education, communication, projects to mitigate the effects, etc.

Dr. Esther Mufunda
Department of Health Sciences, Zimbabwe Open University, Zimbabwe

‘Climate Change Perception and Changing Agents in Africa & South Asia’ presents first-hand experiences of climate change perception. Now more than ever understanding public perceptions of climate change is fundamental in creating effective climate policies, especially within countries that are particularly vulnerable to climate change. Striving to present a comprehensive study of climate perception in Africa and South Asia, this volume presents seven in-depth case studies from Cameroon, the Eastern Himalayas, Kenya, Nepal, and Zimbabwe.
In order to combat climate change, effective communication is essential in order to educate, persuade, warn and mobilize the masses. Therefore, climate change communication is shaped not only by our different experiences and beliefs but also by the underlying cultural and politic values of a country. Within this volume, climate change communication is examined from Cameroonian, Kenyan and Zimbabwean perspectives. From the role of stakeholders to practical field experiences, the individual case studies present an interesting and informative portrait of climate change communication.
It is often the poorest and most vulnerable people who are most affected by the impacts of climate change. Therefore, community-based adaptation is an approach that is aimed at empowering communities in the process of planning for and coping with climate change. In this book, this progressive and innovative approach is examined from a grass-roots perspective that looks to both the Eastern Himalayas and Zimbabwe. Readers are presented with case-studies that investigate the importance of indigenous knowledge, community-based research and the role of social workers in climate change mitigation.
This high-quality resource puts forward a well-informed and accessible discussion of climate change perception that will be of interest to both students and scholars, alike.

Contributing Authors
Acronyms
Definitions
Chapter One INTRODUCTION
Chapter Two CHANGE AGENTS IN CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION-THE ROLE OF ZIMBABWE'S SOCIAL WORKERS
Chapter Three CLIMATE CHANGE COMMUNICATION: THE KENYAN STORY
Chapter Four IT TAKES TWO TO TANGO: POTENTIAL AND ACTUAL USE OF WEATHER AND CLIMATE INFORMATION FOR DECISION-MAKING IN ZIMBABWE
Chapter Five PERCEPTION OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN NEPAL
Chapter Six STAKEHOLDERS IN CLIMATE CHANGE COMMUNICATION IN THE NORTHWEST REGION OF CAMEROON
Chapter Seven TARGETING AUDIENCES AS IMPORTANT GAME CHANGERS IN THE CLIMATE CHANGE COMMUNICATION PUSH: EXAMPLES AND CASES
Chapter Eight TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND COMMUNITY-BASED RESEARCH IN CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION IN EAST HIMALAYAS
Chapter Nine CONCLUSION

Suiven John Paul Tume has a Bachelor’s Degree in Geography (2004), a Postgraduate Diploma in Education (2006) and Master’s Degree in Geography (2008) all from the University of Buea. He is currently a PhD research fellow working on indigenous adaptations to climate change in the agriculture-water systems of the Western Highlands of Cameroon. He is a part-time instructor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies at the Catholic University of Cameroon (CATUC), Bamenda and in the Department of Geography and Planning at the University of Bamenda. He also holds various volunteer positions in different organisations as a researcher and consultant on climate change vulnerability and adaptation in Cameroon.

Vincent Itai Tanyanyiwa is an Environmental Geographer and Sustainability Practitioner who has worked in university education for the last 12 years. His main research is based on understanding how people interact with their natural environment, especially in relation to how humans and non-human species coexist in a world that is human-dominated. His other research interests include ecosystem services, climate change, water issues, rural - social differentiation and urban sustainability.

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Bibliographic Information

Book Title
Climate Change Perception and Changing Agents in Africa & South Asia
ISBN
978-1-62273-308-8
Edition
1st
Number of pages
180
Physical size
236mmx160mm
Illustrations
25 B&W
Publication date
April 2018
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