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Subject: Communication and Journalism

A Postcard View of Hell: One Doughboy’s Souvenir Album of the First World War

Frank Jacob, Queensborough Community College (CUNY) and Mark D. Van Ells

March 2019 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-451-1
Availability: Forthcoming

For many, postcards may seem trivial. They are no more than a souvenir or a way to keep in touch with friends and relatives while on vacation. But, if we look carefully, postcards can offer valuable insights into the time periods in which they were created, and the mentalities of those who bought or sent them. Frank Marhefka, whilst serving in the U.S. Army Motor Transportation Corps during the First World War, amassed a collection of over 150 photographs and photograph postcards. Marhefka’s collection provides a diverse and vivid look into a period of history, which – in many soldiers’ accounts – is not usually visualized with all its cruelties. Emphasizing the pictorial turn of the Great War, this album offers a personal insight into a conflict that caused so much death and destruction. Divided into two sections, this book begins with an introduction into the history of postcards and their extensive use by soldiers during the Great War before outlining Marhefka’s life and military career. Grounded in the specific biographical context of the postcards initial collector, the second section presents images of all the cards and photos found in Marhefka’s visual memoir. Each image is accompanied by a short description of the visible content and suggestions for further reading. As a visual artefact of the First World War and the experiences of a U.S. soldier, this book is aimed at students, scholars and general readers, alike, who are interested in military and modern history. In particular, the First World War as told from the American perspective.

Writing as a Way of Staying Human in a Time that Isn’t

Edited by Nate Mickelson, Guttman Community College, City University of New York (CUNY)

December 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-437-5
Availability: In stock
$61 £44 €50

The human element of our work has never been more important. As Robert Yagelski explains in Writing as a Way of Being (2011), the ideological and social pressures of our institutions put us under increasing pressure to sacrifice our humanity in the interest of efficiency. These problems only grow when we artificially separate self/world and mind/body in our teaching and everyday experiences. Following Yagelski and others, Writing as a Way of Staying Human in a Time that Isn't proposes that intentional acts of writing can awaken us to our interconnectedness and to ways in which we—as individuals and in writing communities—might address the social and environmental challenges of our present and future world. Featuring essays drawn from a range of contexts, including college composition and developmental reading and writing, professional and legal writing, middle school English, dissertation projects, academic conferences, and an online writing group, the collection outlines three ways writing can help us stay human: caring for ourselves and others; honoring the times and spaces of writing; and promoting justice. Each essay describes specific strategies for using writing as a means for staying human in inhuman times. The authors integrate personal stories, descriptions of classroom assignments and activities, and current research in writing studies. Their work shows that writing can contribute to personal, social, and political transformation by nurturing vulnerability, compassion, and empathy among students and instructors alike.

Climate Change Perception and Changing Agents in Africa & South Asia

Edited by Suiven John Paul Tume, Green Care Association, Cameroon and Vincent Itai Tanyanyiwa, Zimbabwe Open University, Zimbabwe

April 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-308-8
Availability: In stock
$57 £41 €46

‘Climate Change Perception and Changing Agents in Africa & South Asia’ presents first-hand experiences of climate change perception. Now more than ever understanding public perceptions of climate change is fundamental in creating effective climate policies, especially within countries that are particularly vulnerable to climate change. Striving to present a comprehensive study of climate perception in Africa and South Asia, this volume presents seven in-depth case studies from Cameroon, the Eastern Himalayas, Kenya, Nepal, and Zimbabwe. In order to combat climate change, effective communication is essential in order to educate, persuade, warn and mobilize the masses. Therefore, climate change communication is shaped not only by our different experiences and beliefs but also by the underlying cultural and politic values of a country. Within this volume, climate change communication is examined from Cameroonian, Kenyan and Zimbabwean perspectives. From the role of stakeholders to practical field experiences, the individual case studies present an interesting and informative portrait of climate change communication. It is often the poorest and most vulnerable people who are most affected by the impacts of climate change. Therefore, community-based adaptation is an approach that is aimed at empowering communities in the process of planning for and coping with climate change. In this book, this progressive and innovative approach is examined from a grass-roots perspective that looks to both the Eastern Himalayas and Zimbabwe. Readers are presented with case-studies that investigate the importance of indigenous knowledge, community-based research and the role of social workers in climate change mitigation. This high-quality resource puts forward a well-informed and accessible discussion of climate change perception that will be of interest to both students and scholars, alike.

The Playbook of Persuasive Reasoning

Everyday Empowerment and Likeability

Gavin F. Hurley, University of Providence

March 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-274-6
Availability: In stock
$58 £41 €47

'The Playbook of Persuasive Reasoning: Everyday Empowerment and Likeability' provides an easy, practical guide to the strategies of persuasive reasoning, which Gavin Hurley argues is crucial to all effective communication. Helping professionals and students to become better and more likeable communicators, this fundamental “playbook” outlines numerous eye-opening communicative maneuvers for readers of all levels and backgrounds. It offers a unique approach to argumentation and persuasion and moves away from the more conventional methods which are often overtechnical, unnecessarily complex or too science oriented. Hurley demonstrates how to successfully apply these strategies of cooperative argumentation to your life in order to succeed professionally, socially and cerebrally. This he argues, will allow you to empower your messaging and increase your social magnetism. 'The Playbook of Persuasive Reasoning' is a down-to-earth guide on effective rhetorical strategizing. It is written for everyday application, based on everyday examples, and embedded in everyday language. Today, successful communication is a highly sought-after trait by international employers, clients, and customers alike. Gavin Hurley shows how a wide range of people can benefit from learning how to deliver more abstract material in an effective manner: both verbally and written. This guide is particularly appealing for professionals, including business managers, as well as academics and students, including public intellectuals. 'The Playbook of Persuasive Reasoning' is a useful book for anyone wanting to enrich their skills and strengthen their powers of communication in order to have a social and professional advantage.

Reporting from the Wars 1850 – 2015

The origins and evolution of the war correspondent

Edited by Barry Turner, University of Lincoln et al.

January 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-101-5
Availability: In stock
$64 £46 €52

From the foundations of the world’s first great empires to the empires of today, war has preoccupied human civilisation for as many as 4000 years. It has fascinated, horrified, thrilled, confused, inspired and disgusted mankind since records began. Provoking such a huge range of emotions and reactions and fulfilling all the elements of newsworthiness, it is hardly surprising that war makes ‘good’ news. Modern technological advancements, such as the camera and television, brought the brutality of war into the homes and daily lives of the public. No longer a far-away and out-of-sight affair, the public’s ability to ‘see’ what was happening on the frontline changed not only how wars were fought but why they were fought. Even when a war is considered ‘popular,’ the involvement of the press and the weight of public opinion has led to criticisms that have transformed modern warfare almost in equal measure to the changes brought about by weapon technology. War reporting seeks to look beyond the official story, to understand the very nature of conflict whilst acknowledging that it is no longer simply good versus evil. This edited volume presents a unique insight into the work of the war correspondent and battlefield photographer from the earliest days of modern war reporting to the present. It reveals how, influenced by the changing face of modern warfare, the work of the war correspondent has been significantly altered in style, method, and practice. By combining historical analysis with experiences of modern day war reporting, this book provides an important contribution to the understanding of this complicated profession, which will be of interest to journalists, academics, and students, alike.

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