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Subject: Economics

Political Corruption in a World in Transition

Edited by Jonathan Mendilow, Rider University and Éric Phélippeau, Université Paris Nanterre, France

April 2019 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-332-3
Availability: Forthcoming

This book argues that the mainstream definitions of corruption, and the key expectations they embed concerning the relationship between corruption, democracy, and the process of democratization, require reexamination. Even critics, who did not take the stable institutions and legal clarity of veteran democracies as a cure-all, assumed that the process of widening the influence on government decision making and implementation allows non-elites to defend their interests, define the acceptable sources and uses of wealth, and demand government accountability. This had proved correct, especially insofar as ‘petty corruption’ is involved. But the assumption that corruption necessarily involves the evasion of democratic principles and a ‘market approach’ in which the corrupt seek to maximize profit do not exhaust the possible incentives for corruption, the types of behaviors involved (for obvious reasons, the tendency in the literature is to focus on bribery), or the range of situations that ‘permit’ corruption in democracies. In the effort to identify some of the problems that require recognition, and to offer a more exhaustive alternative, the chapters in this book focus on corruption in democratic settings (including NGOs and the United Nations which were largely so far ignored), while focusing mainly on behaviors other than bribery.

Market Abuse Regulation in South Africa, the United States of America and the United Kingdom

Howard Chitimira, North West University, South Africa

April 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-260-9
Availability: In stock
$56 £46 €53

This book provides a concise comparison of the regulation and enforcement of the anti-market abuse laws (insider trading and market manipulation) in South Africa, the United States of America (USA) and United Kingdom (UK). Bringing together a number of previously published articles, the book provides a novel discussion of the challenges associated with the enforcement of market abuse laws in both developing countries such as South Africa and developed ones such as the USA and the UK. This is primarily done to examine and expose the current strengths and weaknesses of market abuse laws in relation to certain aspects of the corporate, securities and financial markets environments in South Africa, the USA and the UK. Accordingly, chapters two to five of the book unpack the regulation and enforcement of market abuse laws in South Africa and the USA in a comparative perspective. Thereafter, chapters six to eight of the book discuss the regulation and enforcement of market abuse laws (Financial Markets Act 19 of 2012) and other related statutes in South Africa and the UK. The book proposes some measures that could be utilised to enhance the enforcement of anti-market laws in South Africa, USA and the UK. New market abuse-related challenges that occurred during the global financial crisis are also briefly discussed. The book further provides a relatively adequate overview of the comparative analysis of the regulation of market abuse in South Africa versus two key developed and respected jurisdictions, namely, the USA and the UK. Accordingly, it is hoped that the book can aid regulatory authorities, financial market participants, academics, students and other interested readers to understand market abuse offences and possible measures that could be employed to combat such offences.

Networks of International Trade and Investment

Understanding globalization through the lens of network analysis

Sara Gorgoni, University of Greenwich et al.

March 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-065-0
Availability: Forthcoming

The globalisation of industries in recent decades has led to a fundamental change in the way in which production is structured: products are no longer manufactured in their entirety in a single location. Integration of global trade has been accompanied by disintegration of production. This disintegration, or rather fragmentation, of production has resulted in a shift-change in patterns of international trade and investment, with a rise in trade of intermediate goods and a rise in FDI activity. In addition, multinational enterprises (MNEs) play a more focal role in this reorganisation of production, spreading out their manufacturing and supply chain activities globally, resulting in an increase in FDI and intra-firm trade. This international fragmentation of production challenges our ability to understand the international economy. Global value chains is one leading theoretical approach encompassing and trying to make sense of these changes, but scholars point to several limitations of it, most prominently the difficulty of aggregating from firm-level observations to national-level. A crucial aspect is that these changes in trade and FDI patterns have resulted in a more interconnected world economy. Understanding the interdependencies between entities involved in the fragmented production process is essential in order to understand the way production is organised today. Traditional methods and statistical approaches are insufficient to address this challenge. This edited book makes a case for the use of network analysis alongside existing techniques in answering burning questions in the areas of international business and economics, such as whether trade has become more global or regional, and to what extent emerging economies challenge the role of traditional producers in specific industries. The book looks at how the approach and methodologies of network analysis can contribute in explaining international business and economics phenomena, in particular related to international trade and investment. It will provide a comprehensive but accessible explanation of the applications of network analysis applications and some of the most recent methodological advances that can contribute to research in the area of international trade and investment. (provisional and subject to change)

Intergenerational Responsibility in the 21st Century

Edited by Julia M. Puaschunder, The New School

January 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-102-2
Availability: Forthcoming

Intergenerational responsibility is multi-faceted. This edited volume reflects intergenerational aspects in light of spatial, age and racial segregation, global warming, and the aging Western world population. Intergenerational global governance is addressed in the era of globalization and migration. The intergenerational glue, intergenerational crises resilience strategies and intergenerational responses to external shocks serve as innovative global responsibility implementation guidelines in the international arena. Fostering intergenerational harmony through intergenerational income mobility and intergenerational opportunities, environmental protection and sustainable development aids alleviate the most pressing contemporary challenges of humankind. Overall, this interdisciplinary and applied contribution to the scholarship on intergenerational responsibility supports the leadership and management of global governance agency in the private and public sectors.

Generational Interdependencies: The Social Implications for Welfare

Edited by Beverley A. Searle, University of Dundee

January 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-186-2
Availability: In stock
$60 £49 €56

The issue of generational transfers is growing in importance. Populations are ageing, placing an increasing burden on provision of pensions, health care and other welfare services. In many nations the imbalance between a growing, older generation, supported by a shrinking younger generation, has fuelled debates about intergenerational justice. The key argument being that political and institutional developments over the last century have been to the advantage of older generations at the expense of current younger and future generations. But this only addresses half of the story, neglecting the flows of resources, through private, family channels. One key response to the growing fiscal problem of ageing societies has been to focus responsibility on self-funding and familial support. The growth of asset values, particularly housing, which are concentrated among the elderly, underpin such strategies. But this exposes new risks as potentially extractable resources are determined by wider fluctuations in the economy, and housing markets in particular. Clearly, these cohort effects, and responses to them, play out differently in different national developmental settings, depending on long-run patterns of economic, social and demographic change. This collection address these issues and provides original insights across different international contexts. The collection focusses on financial and non-financial transfers, generational interdependencies, and the role of labour and housing markets in welfare support, set against the changing economic landscape following the Great Financial Crisis of 2007. Although institutional and national differences exist the key emerging issues are the same: the financial and welfare challenges of supporting aging in societies; inequalities in the availability of assets across individuals, families and nations; and the extent to which private asset accumulation can support families over the life course. Drawing from examples across European countries, this collection will nonetheless be relevant to researchers and policy makers in other nations addressing the complexities of providing welfare across the life course in the face of restricted financial resources.

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