Search

Browse

Anthropology (20) Art (102) Business and Finance (32) Cognitive Science and Psychology (35) Communication and Journalism (29) Economics (106) Education (38) History (92) Human Geography (18) Interdisciplinary (23) Language and Linguistics (100) Law (9) Music Studies (12) Philosophy (164) Political Science and International Relations (81) Sociology (244) Statistics and Quantitative Methods (16) Philosophy (46) Sociology (30) Education (29) Series in Literary Studies (27) Politics (19) Language and Linguistics (17) World History (17) Art (14) Philosophy of Religion (14) Bridging Languages and Scholarship (13) Cognitive Science and Psychology (13) Critical Perspectives on Social Science (12) Anthropology (11) Economics (11) Business and Finance (10) Cinema and Culture (10) Curating and Interpreting Culture (9) Music (9) Series in American History (8) Series in Critical Media Studies (7) Economic Methodology (7) Law (7) History of Art (7) Vernon Classics in Economics (6) Communication (6) Philosophy of Personalism (5) Series on Climate Change and Society (5) Economic Development (5) Economic History (5) Philosophy of Forgiveness (4) Performing Arts (4) Series in Creative Writing Studies (3) History of Science (3) Series in Built Environment (2) Series in Contemporary History (2) Series in Innovation Studies (2) Serie en Estudios Culturales (1) Serie en Filosofía (1) Series in Classical Studies (1) Series in Design (1) Series in Heritage Studies (1) Series in Philosophy of Science (1) Series in Social Equality and Justice (1) Series in Urban Studies (1) The Interdisciplinary Built Environment (1) Economics of Technological Change (1) English Spanish
by Author


Browsing with filters

Series: Series in American History

Mary Hunter Austin: A Female Writer’s Protest Against the First World War in the United States

Jowan A. Mohammed, Nord University, Norway

July 2021 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-753-6
Availability: In stock
169pp. ¦ $49 £36 €41

Mary Hunter Austin (1868-1934) is often referred to as an important American writer of the early decades of the 20th century, with much of her work concerning nature and Native American culture. Hunter Austin was also considered to be one of the early feminist writers, whose works had an impact on the redefinition of gender roles during the First World War. This study examines the feminist perception of her later years, connecting feminist history to questions related to memory through a study of literature, politics, and interpretations of the past (both feminist and gendered). It demonstrates how far the perception and remembrance of the past are determined by later agendas and considerations. This work is an insightful and detailed study, meant to expand knowledge within the field of collective memory about Mary Hunter Austin’s life and work alike. This book is intended for those with a general interest in feminism, socialism, World War One and gender issues. Academics and specialists in the field will value new research on a crucial figure in American literary history.

Florentine Ariosto Jones: A Yankee in Switzerland and the Early Globalization of the American System of Watchmaking

Frank Jacob, Nord University, Norway

July 2021 / ISBN: 978-1-64889-289-9
Availability: In stock
129pp. [Color] ¦ $75 £55 €62

This book recounts the story of Florentine Ariosto Jones, who after the Civil War decided to manufacture watches. Combining the cheap labor available at the time in Switzerland with US manufacturing technologies, Jones embarked on his venture to produce affordable watches for the American market. Consequently, he became a pioneer in the business of outsourcing labor for economic purposes through his contracting of labor to Europe. While the company still exists today, very little is known about Jones. The present book will undoubtedly change this by telling the fascinating story of an American adventurer and his pursuit to globalize American watchmaking at the end of the 19th Century.

Florentine Ariosto Jones: A Yankee in Switzerland and the Early Globalization of the American System of Watchmaking

Frank Jacob, Nord University, Norway

July 2021 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-887-8
Availability: In stock
129pp. ¦ $46 £33 €38

This book recounts the story of Florentine Ariosto Jones, who after the Civil War decided to manufacture watches. Combining the cheap labor available at the time in Switzerland with US manufacturing technologies, Jones embarked on his venture to produce affordable watches for the American market. Consequently, he became a pioneer in the business of outsourcing labor for economic purposes through his contracting of labor to Europe. While the company still exists today, very little is known about Jones. The present book will undoubtedly change this by telling the fascinating story of an American adventurer and his pursuit to globalize American watchmaking at the end of the 19th Century.

We Hold These Truths to Be Self-Evident: The National Guard and the Categorical Imperative

Anne C. Armstrong, National Guard Educational Foundation; National Guard Memorial Museum, Library, and Archive

May 2021 / ISBN: 978-1-64889-148-9
Availability: In stock
158pp. ¦ $44 £33 €38

In this monograph, Dr. Armstrong argues that a nation founded in Enlightenment theory can rely on Kant’s categorical imperative as a rationale for voluntary service in one’s local National Guard. Since the 19th century, a Utilitarian argument has been the favored rationale, but in We Hold These Truths to be Self-Evident: The National Guard and the Categorical Imperative Dr. Armstrong contends that there is also a normative rationale. The author traces Guard history from its inception in 1636 to the present day and applies Kant’s unchanging categorical imperative to volunteer service in the militias. She highlights that this is an ideal that is not always met by frail human beings but that the categorical imperative is always there, lurking in the historical record. With a thorough analysis of Kant’s reasoning, the theory is chronologically applied to volunteer service in the National Guard through the perspective of the leadership of each particular era. This book is ideal for the study of American history, Enlightenment philosophy, and political science. It will appeal to scholars and academics as well as officers in Professional Military Education (PME), service academies and War Colleges, and the National Defense University.

Perplexing Patriarchies: Fatherhood Among Black Opponents and White Defenders of Slavery

Pierre Islam, Yale University

September 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-462-7
Availability: In stock
190pp. ¦ $60 £45 €51

Perplexing Patriarchies examines the rhetorical usage (and lived experience) of fatherhood among three African American abolitionists and three of their white proslavery opponents in the United States during the nineteenth century. Both the prominent abolitionists (Frederick Douglass, Martin Delany, and Henry Garnet), as well as the prominent proslavery advocates (Henry Hammond, George Fitzhugh, and Richard Dabney), appealed to the popular image of the father, husband, and head of household in order to attack or justify slavery. How and why could these opposing individuals rely on appeals to the same ideal of fatherhood to come to completely different and opposing conclusions? This book strives to find the answer by first acknowledging that both the abolitionists and the proslavery men shared similar concerns about the contested status of fatherhood in the nineteenth century. However, due to subtle differences in their starting assumptions, and different choices of what parts of a father’s responsibilities to emphasize, the black abolitionists conceived of an ideal father who protected the autonomy of his dependents, while the proslavery men conceived of one whose authority necessitated the subordination of those he protected. Finding that these differences arose from choices in starting assumptions and emphases rather than total disagreement on what the role of the father should be, this work reveals that black abolitionists were not radically critiquing the gender conventions of their day, but innovatively working within those conventions to turn them towards social reform. This discovery opens up a new way for historians to consider how oppressed peoples negotiated the intellectual boundaries of the societies which oppressed them: Not necessarily breaking entirely from those boundaries, nor passively accepting them, but ingeniously synthesizing a worldview from within their confines that still allowed for freedom and personal autonomy.

EV MDC SSL