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Series: Series in Literary Studies

Hermeneutics, Metacognition, and Writing

Edited by Maryann Pasda DiEdwardo, Lehigh University; University of Maryland Global Campus

December 2019 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-822-9
Availability: In stock
124pp. ¦ $41 £31 €35

'Hermeneutics, Metacognition, and Writing' investigates the social functionality of actions as an essential criterion of study. It focuses on hermeneutics: interpretation through the lens of philosophy of metacognition. Vital contributions to the book include several chapters by Dr. Maryann P. DiEdwardo herself, which explore various facets of the central topic, including the intersectionality of hermeneutics, metacognition, and semiotics, as well as social movements. Dr. Juliet Emmanuel writes on the subject of the connections between hermeneutics, metacognition, and writing, and Jill Kroeger Kinkade presents a chapter on D.H.Lawrence, Hilda Doolittle, and Virginia Woolf’s portrayals of consciousness. Patricia Pasda discusses what links Sr. Francis of Assisi, dogs, and hermeneutics; Dr. T. Madison Peschock presents a feminist paper concerning abuse of those not wielding power. Susan Stangeland offers her expertise and scholarship in the area of Biblical Hermeneutics. This collection of critiques and case studies examines the imagined cultural landscape of specific works and associated activities such as fine art, music, poetry, and digital humanities, which aim to initiate self-monitoring as metacognition, or meta-reflection, by creating interior interpersonal space to overcome adversity. This edited volume will be of particular interest to scholars and students of textual hermeneutics as it relates to prose writing and artistic works in non-verbal media.

Encountering Difference: New Perspectives on Genre, Travel and Gender

Edited by Gigi Adair, Universität Bielefeld, Germany and Lenka Filipova, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany

October 2019 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-851-9
Availability: In stock
156pp. [Color] ¦ $71 £53 €61

This edited collection poses crucial questions about the relationship between gender and genre in travel writing, asking how gender shapes formal and thematic approaches to the various generic forms employed to represent and recreate travel. While the question of the genre of travel writing has often been debated (is it a genre, a hybrid genre, a sub-genre of autobiography?), and recent years have been much attention to travel writing and gender, these have rarely been combined. This book sheds light on how the gendered nature of writing and reading about travel affect the genre choices and strategies of writers, as well as the way in which travel writing is received. It reconsiders traditional and frequently studied forms of travel writing, both European and non-European. In addition, it pursues questions about the connections between travel writing and other genres, such as the novel and films, minor forms including journalism and blogging, and new sub-genres such as the ‘new nature writing’; focusing in particular on the political ramifications of genre in travel writing. The collection is international in focus with discussions of works by authors from Europe, Asia, Australia, and both North and South America; consequently, it will be of great interest to scholars and historians in those regions.

Diary as Literature: Through the Lens of Multiculturalism in America

Edited by Angela R. Hooks

November 2019 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-611-9
Availability: In stock
204pp. ¦ $61 £46 €52

Meandering plots, dead ends, and repetition, diaries do not conform to literary expectations, yet they still manage to engage the reader, arouse empathy and elicit emotional responses that many may be more inclined to associate with works of fiction. Blurring the lines between literary genres, diary writing can be considered a quasi-literary genre that offers a unique insight into the lives of those we may have otherwise never discovered. This edited volume examines how diarists, poets, writers, musicians, and celebrities use their diary to reflect on multiculturalism and intercultural relations. Within this book, multiculturalism is defined as the sociocultural experiences of underrepresented groups who fall outside the mainstream of race, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual orientation, disability, and language. Multiculturalism reflects different cultures and racial groups with equal rights and opportunities, equal attention and representation without assimilation. In America, the multicultural society includes various cultural and ethnic groups that do not necessarily have engaging interaction with each other whereas, importantly, intercultural is a community of cultures who learn from each other, and have respect and understand different cultures. Presented as a collection of academic essays and creative writing, The Diary as Literature Through the Lens of Multiculturalism in America analyses diary writing in its many forms from oral diaries and memoirs to letters and travel writing. Divided into three sections: Diaries of the American Civil War, Diaries of Trips and Letters of Diaspora, and Diaries of Family, Prison Lyrics, and a Memoir, the contributors bring a range of expertise to this quasi-literary genre including comparative and transatlantic literature, composition and rhetoric, history and women and gender studies.

Negotiating Waters: Seas, Oceans, and Passageways in the Colonial and Postcolonial Anglophone World

Edited by André Dodeman, University of Grenoble Alpes, France and Nancy Pedri, Memorial University of Newfoundland

July 2019 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-758-1
Availability: In stock
212pp. ¦ $60 £45 €51

This book examines how seas, oceans, and passageways have shaped and reshaped cultural identities, spurred stories of reunion and separation, and redefined entire nations. It explores how entire communities have crossed seas and oceans, voluntarily or not, to settle in foreign lands and undergone identity, cultural and literary transformations. It also explores how these crossings are represented. The book thus contributes to oceanic studies, a field of study that asks how the seas and oceans have and continue to affect political (narratives of exploration, cartography), international (maritime law), identity (insularity), and literary issues (survival narratives, fishing stories). Divided into three sections, Negotiating Waters explores the management, the crossings, and the re-imaginings of the seas and oceans that played such an important role in the configuration of the colonial and postcolonial world and imagination. In their careful considerations of how water figures prominently in maps, travel journals, diaries, letters, and literary narratives from the 17th century onwards, the three thematic sections come together to shed light on how water, in all of its shapes and forms, has marked lands, nations, and identities. They thus offer readers from different disciplines and with different colonial and postcolonial interests the possibility to investigate and discover new approaches to maritime spaces. By advancing views on how seas and oceans exert power through representation, Negotiating Waters engages in important critical work in an age of rising concern about maritime environments.

Urban Walking –The Flâneur as an Icon of Metropolitan Culture in Literature and Other Media

Edited by Oliver Bock, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Germany and Isabel Vila-Cabanes, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Germany

ISBN: 978-1-62273-680-5
Availability: Pre-order
$63 £47 €53

The volume assembles fresh treatments on the flâneur in literature, film and culture from a variety of angles. Its individual contributions cover established as well as previously unnoticed textual and filmic source materials in a historical perspective ranging from the late nineteenth to the early twenty-first century. The range of topics covered demonstrates the ongoing productivity of flânerie as a viable paradigm for the artistic approach to urban culture and the continuing suitability of flânerie as an analytic category for the scholarly examination of urban representation in the arts. This productiveness also extends to the questioning, re-evaluation, and enhancement of flânerie’s theoretical foundations as they were laid down by Walter Benjamin and others. The work will be particularly relevant for students and scholars of literary studies, film studies and gender studies, as well as for theoretical approaches to flânerie as an important aspect of urban culture.

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