Search

Browse

Anthropology (19) Art (99) Business and Finance (31) Cognitive Science and Psychology (31) Communication and Journalism (27) Economics (104) Education (37) History (82) Human Geography (18) Interdisciplinary (22) Language and Linguistics (89) Law (9) Music Studies (12) Philosophy (149) Political Science and International Relations (78) Sociology (224) Statistics and Quantitative Methods (15) Philosophy (42) Sociology (30) Education (29) Series in Literary Studies (25) Politics (18) Language and Linguistics (15) Art (14) World History (14) Philosophy of Religion (12) Bridging Languages and Scholarship (11) Cognitive Science and Psychology (11) Anthropology (11) Economics (11) Critical Perspectives on Social Science (10) Business and Finance (10) Curating and Interpreting Culture (9) Cinema and Culture (9) Music (9) Series in Critical Media Studies (7) Economic Methodology (7) Law (7) History of Art (7) Vernon Classics in Economics (6) Communication (6) Philosophy of Personalism (5) Series in American History (5) Series on Climate Change and Society (5) Economic Development (5) Economic History (5) Philosophy of Forgiveness (4) Performing Arts (4) History of Science (3) Series in Built Environment (2) Series in Contemporary History (2) Series in Creative Writing Studies (2) Series in Innovation Studies (2) Serie en Filosofía (1) Series in Classical Studies (1) Series in Design (1) Series in Heritage Studies (1) Series in Social Equality and Justice (1) Series in Urban Studies (1) The Interdisciplinary Built Environment (1) Economics of Technological Change (1) English Spanish
by Author


Browsing with filters

Series: Series in Literary Studies

Names as Metaphors in Shakespeare’s Comedies

Grant W. Smith, Eastern Washington University

ISBN: 978-1-64889-018-5
Availability: Available 4 weeks
371pp. ¦ $73 £54 €61

'Names as Metaphors in Shakespeare’s Comedies' presents a comprehensive study of names in Shakespeare’s comedies. Although names are used in daily speech as simple designators, often with minimal regard for semantic or phonological suggestiveness, their coinage is always based on analogy. They are words (i.e., signs) borrowed from previous referents and contexts, and applied to new referents. Thus, in the literary use of language, names are figurative inventions and have measurable thematic significance: they evoke an association of attributes between two or more referents, contextualize each work of literature within its time, and reflect the artistic development of the writer. In the introduction, Smith describes the literary use of names as creative choices that show the indebtedness of authors to previous literature, as well as their imaginative descriptions (etymologically and phonologically) of memorable character types, and their references to cultural phenomena that make their names meaningful to their contemporary readers and audience. This book presents fourteen essays demonstrating the analytical models explained in the introduction. These essays focus on Shakespeare’s comedies as presented in the First Folio. They do not follow the chronological order of their composition; instead, the individual essays give special attention to differences between the plays that suggest Shakespeare’s artistic development, including the varied sources of his borrowings, the differences between his etymological and phonological coinages, the frequency and types of his topical references, and his use of epithets and generics. This book will appeal to Shakespeare students and scholars at all levels, particularly those who are keen on studying his comedies. This study will also be relevant for researchers and graduate students interested in onomastics. He can be reached at gsmith@ewu.edu.

Latin in Modern Fiction

Who Says It’s a Dead Language?

Henryk Hoffmann

March 2021 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-949-3
Availability: In stock
306pp. ¦ $61 £46 €52

The goal of this book is to prove that Latin is not a dead language by demonstrating how prevalent and strong it still is in modern Western culture. In order to do so, the author, an English philologist with a long experience as a Latin educator, catalogues, explains and interprets Latin quotations and references in a multitude of twentieth- and twenty-first-century literary works by—primarily—mainstream authors (from Aldous Huxley to Saul Bellow to John Irving), crime/mystery writers (from Raymond Chandler to Elizabeth George to Dennis Lehane) and frontier/western novelists (from Emerson Hough to Larry McMurtry). The three areas of fiction constituting the main scope of the book indicate the author’s major interest and preference, as well as the subject matter of his extensive research, both prior and current—the former related to his already published books. The writers offering the most impressive contributions to the thesis are featured in the three parts of the main body; those with lesser input are listed in the Appendix. The prospective readers of the book include all Latin students and educators at the secondary and college levels worldwide.

The Portrait of an Artist as a Pathographer: On Writing Illnesses and Illnesses in Writing

Edited by Jayjit Sarkar, Raiganj University, India and Jagannath Basu, Sitalkuchi College, India

ISBN: 978-1-64889-064-2
Availability: Available 4 weeks
323pp. ¦ $65 £48 €55

Focusing on the various intersections between illness and literature across time and space, The Portrait of an Artist as a Pathographer seeks to understand how ontological, phenomenological and epistemological experiences of illness have been dealt with and represented in literary writings and literary studies. In this volume, scholars from across the world have come together to understand how the pathological condition of being ill (the sufferers), as well as the pathologists dealing with the ill (the healers and caregivers), have shaped literary works. The language of medical science, with its jargon, and the language of the every day, with its emphasis on utility, prove equally insufficient and futile in capturing the pain and suffering of illness. It is this insufficiency and futility that makes us turn towards the canonical works of Joseph Conrad, Samuel Beckett, William Carlos Williams, Virginia Woolf, Kazuo Ishiguro, Miroslav Holub as well as the non-canonical António Lobo Antunes, Yumemakura Baku, Wopko Jensma and Vaslav Nijinsky. This volume helps in understanding and capturing the metalanguage of illness while presenting us with the tradition of ‘writing pain’. In an effort to expand the definition of pathography to include those who are on the other side of pain, the essays in this collection aim to portray the above-mentioned pathographers as artists, turning the anxiety and suffering of illness into an art form. Looking deeply into such creative aspects of illness, this book also seeks to evoke the possibility of pathography as world literature. This book will be of particular interest to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students, as well as scholars of literature and medical humanities who are interested in the intersections between literary studies and medical science.

Creating a Transnational Space in the First Year Writing Classroom

Edited by W. Ordeman, University of North Texas

January 2021 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-952-3
Availability: In stock
187pp. ¦ $44 £33 €37

During the first twenty years of the new millennium, many scholars turned their attention to translingualism, an idea that focuses on the merging of language in distinct social and spatial contexts to serve unique, mutually constitutive, and temporal purposes. This volume joins the more recent shift in pedagogical studies towards an altogether distinct phenomenon: transnationalism. By developing a framework for transnational pedagogical practice, this volume demonstrates the exclusive opportunities afforded to freshmen writers who write in transnational spaces that act as points of fusion for several cultural, lingual, and national identities. With reference to recent works on translingualism and transnationalism, this volume is an attempt to conceptualize effective writing pedagogy in freshman writing courses, which are becoming more and more transnational. It also provides educators and first year writing administrators with practical pedagogical tools to help them use their transnational spaces as a means of achieving their desired learning outcomes as well as teaching students threshold concepts of composition studies. This volume will be particularly useful for first year writing faculty at colleges and universities as well as writing program administrators to create a more effective curriculum that addresses these needs in classroom settings. All scholars with a doctorate in Rhetoric and Composition, English as a Second Language, Translation Studies, to name a few, will also find this a valuable resource.

Publishing Northanger Abbey: Jane Austen and the Writing Profession

Margie Burns, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

October 2020 / ISBN: 978-1-64889-131-1
Availability: In stock
266pp. ¦ $60 £45 €51

Jane Austen was not born a global icon. It took years for her to break into print. Her first publication came after almost a decade of ups and downs, and her first novel out was not the first she sent to a publisher. Up to a point, lovers of Jane Austen probably know the publication history of Northanger Abbey—written first, published last. Austen wrote and revised the novel early, tried to get it published, then wrote all her other novels and ended up having Northanger Abbey come out with Persuasion, her last finished work. What we don’t know would fill a book—this book. The objective is to make her early publishing history clear, bringing to light information and original sources not drawn upon before. Beyond her lifetime, clarifying her publishing history also sheds light on an under-regarded novel. The early novel first titled Susan, then Catherine, then Northanger Abbey has sometimes been dismissed by critics, but it was never unimportant to Jane Austen herself. Publishing “Northanger Abbey”: Jane Austen and the Writing Profession is for all lovers of Jane Austen, in and out of universities, libraries, and fan clubs, including readers now staying home with their favorite novelists during the pandemic.

EV MDC SSL