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Series: Vernon Series in Cinema and Culture

Directing the Narrative and Shot Design

The Art and Craft of Directing

Lubomir Kocka, Savannah College of Art and Design

April 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-399-6
Availability: In stock
$68 £49 €55

This book is a “directing-altering book” as it provides high-quality learning resources that encourage and challenge film enthusiasts, aspiring directors, film students, and professionals to strive for new levels of excellence and impact in their film directing, television directing, and new media directing. This book puts forward a well-informed and innovative discussion of critical director’s choices that have not previously been considered by existing texts on film and television directing. This book presents a wide range of directorial concepts and directing exercises that include: • Psycho-physiological regularities in left-right/right-left orientation transferred to a shot design. How directors can manipulate the viewer’s perception of a character and of the journey they are on using screen direction. • Methodology and visual strategy for rendering a scene based on character perspective. • The directorial concept of emotional manipulation. • Demystifying the 180-degree rule.

Directing the Narrative and Shot Design

The Art and Craft of Directing

Lubomir Kocka, Savannah College of Art and Design

January 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-288-3
Availability: In stock
$103 £73 €83

This book is a “directing-altering book” as it provides high-quality learning resources that encourage and challenge film enthusiasts, aspiring directors, film students, and professionals to strive for new levels of excellence and impact in their film directing, television directing, and new media directing. This book puts forward a well-informed and innovative discussion of critical director’s choices that have not previously been considered by existing texts on film and television directing. This book presents a wide range of directorial concepts and directing exercises that include: • Psycho-physiological regularities in left-right/right-left orientation transferred to a shot design. How directors can manipulate the viewer’s perception of a character and of the journey they are on using screen direction. • Methodology and visual strategy for rendering a scene based on character perspective. • The directorial concept of emotional manipulation. • Demystifying the 180-degree rule.

Looking-Glass Wars: Spies on British Screens since 1960

Alan Burton, University of Leicester, UK

January 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-290-6
Availability: In stock
$71 £53 €60

Looking-Glass Wars: Spies on British Screens since 1960 is a detailed historical and critical overview of espionage in British film and television in the important period since 1960. From that date, the British spy screen was transformed under the influence of the tremendous success of James Bond in the cinema (the spy thriller), and of the new-style spy writing of John le Carré and Len Deighton (the espionage story). In the 1960s, there developed a popular cycle of spy thrillers in the cinema and on television. The new study looks in detail at the cycle which in previous work has been largely neglected in favour of the James Bond films. The study also brings new attention to espionage on British television and popular secret agent series such as Spy Trap, Quiller and The Sandbaggers. It also gives attention to the more ‘realistic’ representation of spying in the film and television adaptations of le Carré and Deighton, and other dramas with a more serious intent. In addition, there is wholly original attention given to ‘nostalgic’ spy fictions on screen, adaptations of classic stories of espionage which were popular in the late 1970s and through the 1980s, and to ‘historical’ spy fiction, dramas which treated ‘real’ cases of espionage and their characters, most notably the notorious Cambridge Spies. Detailed attention is also given to the ‘secret state’ thriller, a cycle of paranoid screen dramas in the 1980s which portrayed the intelligence services in a conspiratorial light, best understood as a reaction to excessive official secrecy and anxieties about an unregulated security service. The study is brought up-to-date with an examination of screen espionage in Britain since the end of the Cold War. The approach is empirical and historical. The study examines the production and reception, literary and historical contexts of the films and dramas. It is the first detailed overview of the British spy screen in its crucial period since the 1960s and provides fresh attention to spy films, series and serials never previously considered.

And the Loser is: A History of Oscar Oversights

Aubrey Malone

January 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-322-4
Availability: In stock
$60 £46 €51

This is the first book of its kind. Aubrey Malone has gone back to the start of the Oscar ceremonies and discovered that mistakes have been made every year in the choice of what has been deemed “best” in the categories of acting, directing, producing and the subsidiary awards. He has identified all the great stars (Garbo, Montgomery Clift, Peter O’Toole, Barbara Stanwyck, etc.) who never held Oscars in their hands, and also iconic directors like Stanley Kubrick who were never thus honored. Why were some people over-rewarded by the Academy and why did others fall below the radar? The author outlines all of the extraneous factors leading to voting choices, and how Oscar pariahs have often been subsequently (or even posthumously) awarded for the wrong films to make up for omissions in a given year. With both wit and wisdom he has written an “alternative” history of the Oscars that will be required reading for both academics and film buffs alike. It tells the story behind the story. “If there were Oscars for research, Aubrey Malone would be right up there with the best of them.” (Film Ireland)

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