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Series: Vernon Series in Philosophy of Religion

Indigenous People and the Christian Faith: A New Way Forward

Edited by William H. U. Anderson, Concordia University of Edmonton in Alberta and Charles Muskego, Concordia University of Edmonton in Alberta

ISBN: 978-1-62273-816-8
Availability: Available 4 weeks
300pp. ¦ $62 £47 €53

Indigenous People and the Christian Faith: A New Way Forward provides detailed historical, cultural and theological background and analysis to a very delicate and pressing subject facing many people around the world. The book is “glocal”: both local and global, as represented by international scholars. Every continent is represented by both Indigenous and non-indigenous people who desire to make a difference with the delicate problematics and relationships. The history of Indigenous people around the world is inextricably linked with Christianity and Colonialism. The book is completely interdisciplinary by employing historians, literary critics, biblical scholars and theologians, sociologists, philosophers and ordained engineers. The Literary Intent of the book, without presuming nor claiming too much for itself, is to provide practical thinking that will help all people move past the pain and dysfunction of the past, toward mutual understanding, communication, and practical actions in the present and future.

Jesus and his Two Fathers: The Person and the Legacy

Uri Wernik

October 2019 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-770-3
Availability: In stock
232pp. ¦ $62 £46 €52

Who was Jesus in real life? What inspired his ideas? What did he aim to achieve? What drew his disciples to him? How was he influenced by them? Unlike the many “quests for the historical Jesus”, as a psychologist, Wernik answers these questions from the perspectives of psychology and the social sciences. This book’s central axis is the theme of the father. It looks at the family constellation into which Jesus was born, where he was raised by a stepfather. It also investigates the relationship he develops with God, his father in heaven; and examines how he became a father figure to his disciples and followers. It is hoped that readers will also think about their own father when reading, the one usually called “dad”. Jesus and His Two Fathers sees Jesus’ love of peace and appeasement doctrine, as well as his difficulty with anger control, in the context of his upbringing and family constellation. Wernik offers a solution to the problem of the “missing years” which were unaccounted in the New Testament. He examines the internal conflicts in Jesus’ movement, and the tensions with the religious establishment, which led to his death. Jesus did not see himself as the Messiah, and Wernik shows him in fact as a great reformer of Judaism, who changed the notions of righteousness, the relation of the believers to God, and the status of the commandments. This book will be of interest to scholars, teachers and students in the humanities and social sciences, among others in the fields of religion, especially Christianity and Judaism. It is aimed at interested discerning readers of non-fiction in these areas.

The Pertinence of Exodus: Philosophical Questions on the Contemporary Symbolism of the Biblical Story

Edited by Sandro Gorgone, University of Messina, Italy and Laurin Mackowitz, University of Innsbruck, Austria

August 2019 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-771-0
Availability: In stock
216pp. ¦ $61 £47 €54

The Exodus has a risky and combative character that links individuals to their unconscious, to the uncertainty of their reality, and to the possibility of the disturbing event of the incalculable arrival of the Other. This encounter with the unknown does not expect a messianic salvation but a human solution, which is aware that change requires the abandonment of self-referential identities. This eccentricity is more than evasive desertion or escapism, but an experiment with new modes of organizing community that grows on the responsibilities that go with it. This collected volume gathers contemporary philosophical perspectives on the Exodus, examining the story’s symbolic potentials and dynamics in the light of current social political events. The imagination of the Promised Land, the figure of the migrant, the provisional and precarious dwelling of the camp, the promise of a better future or the gradual estrangement from inherited habits are all challenges of our time that are already conceptualized in the Exodus. The authors reaffirm the pertinence of the story by addressing the fundamental link between the ancient narrative and the human condition of the 21st century.

To Know as I Am Known: The Communion of the Saints and the Ontology of Love

Mark McLeod-Harrison, George Fox University, USA

May 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-388-0
Availability: In stock
276pp. ¦ $62 £45 €50

The doctrine of the communion of the saints is central in the spiritual lives and theology of millions of Christians. However, it has been neglected by much recent philosophical scholarship. ‘To know as I am known’ addresses this oversight by offering a contemporary analysis of this venerated doctrine. By taking two related puzzles inherent in the doctrine itself, McLeod-Harrison explores and reflects on not only the communion of the saints but also on the ontology of love. Divided into five parts, this book provides an account of human nature and sin, before suggesting a way of thinking of love that is rooted both in the doctrine of the Trinity and in the thought of several contemporary analytic thinkers along with Dostoyevsky, Eckerd, Royce. While the integral issues of the doctrine are related to the “why-be-moral” problem, McLeod-Harrison shows that the challenges of the doctrine arise from the unique nature of agape (divine love). Thus, the communion of the saints comes through the challenges intact with a plausible interpretation of saintly motivation and human solidarity. Born out of 20 years of thought, this essential and sophisticated reflection serves as an important contribution to the field of the philosophy of religion that will inspire and engage students, scholars, and Christians, alike.

Answering the New Atheists: How Science Points to God and to the Benefits of Christianity

Anthony Walsh, Boise State University

May 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-390-3
Availability: In stock
208pp. ¦ $59 £42 €48

In the face of increasing attacks on Christianity by militant new atheists, Christians should be able to robustly defend their beliefs in the language spoken by Christianity’s detractors—science. Atheists claim that science and religion are incompatible and in constant conflict, but this book argues that this is assuredly not true. In order to rebut the polemic agenda of the new atheists who want God banned from the public square, this book engages with the physical and natural sciences, social science, philosophy, and history. It shows that evidence from these diverse disciplines constitutes clear signposts to God and the benefits of Christianity for societies, families, and individuals. Answering the New Atheists begins by examining what new atheism is, before demolishing its claim that Christianity is harmful by showing the many benefits it has for freedom and democracy, morality, longevity, and physical and mental health. Many historians of science contend that science was given its impetus by the Christian principle that a rational God wants us to discover his fingerprints on nature. Thus, in subsequent chapters, Walsh presents a well-informed and philosophical-based analysis of the Big Bang and cosmic fine-tuning, the unimaginable improbability of factors that make this planet habitable, and the multiverse often called the “last refuge of the desperate atheist.” Interdisciplinary in its approach, this book adeptly explores the very problematic issues of the origin and evolution of life that have forced many top-rate scientists including Nobel Prize winners, who have thought deeply about the philosophical meaning of their work, to accept God as the Creator of everything.

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