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Series: Women's Studies

Madwomen in Social Justice Movements, Literatures, and Art

Edited by Jessica Lowell Mason, University at Buffalo and Nicole Crevar, University of Arizona

November 2022 / ISBN: 978-1-64889-513-5
Availability: In stock
263pp. ¦ $90 £74 €84

'Madwomen in Social Justice Movements, Literatures, and Art' boldly reasserts the importance of the Madwoman more than four decades after the publication of Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar’s seminal work in feminist literary criticism, 'The Madwoman in the Attic'. Since Gilbert and Gubar’s work was published, the Madwoman has reemerged to do important work, rock the academic boat, and ignite social justice agency inside and outside of academic spaces, moving beyond the literary context that defined the Madwoman in the late 20th century. In this dynamic collection of essays, scholars, creative writers, and Mad activists come together to (re)define the Madwoman in pluralistic and expansive ways and to realize new potential in Mad agency. This collection blazes new directions of thinking through Madness as a gendered category, comprised of a combination of creative works that (re)imagine the figure of the Madwoman, speeches in which Mad-identifying artists and writers reclaim the label of “Madwoman,” and scholarly essays that articulate ambitious theories of the Madwoman. The collection is an interdisciplinary scholarly resource that will appeal to multiple academic fields, including literary studies, disability studies, feminist studies, and Mad studies. Additionally, the work contributes to the countermovement against colonial, sanist, patriarchal, and institutional social practices that continue to silence women and confine them to the metaphorical attic. Appealing to a broad audience of readers, 'Madwomen in Social Justice Movements, Literatures, and Art' is a cutting-edge inquiry into the implications of Madness as a theoretical tool in which dissenting, deviant, and abnormal women and gender non-conforming writers, artists, and activists open the door to Mad futurities.

Women and Religion in Britain Today

Belonging

Edited by Yvonne Bennett, Canterbury Christ Church University

November 2022 / ISBN: 978-1-64889-222-6
Availability: In stock
218pp. ¦ $87 £72 €82

Little is written about the lived religious lives of women in 21st-century Britain. The authors of this book seek to address this gap by exploring contemporary women’s spirituality in Britain. As the authors inhabit different academic fields, we bring together an interdisciplinary collection of voices to address this subject. We examine a range of ways in which religion continues to impact the lives of women in Britain today. The chapters of this book examine the manner in which religion and spirituality continue to impact women’s lives, and by doing so, we offer a heterogeneous look at religion in the 21st century. We not only tackle the spirituality of our research participants but, by writing about our experiences as ‘women being spiritual’, we offer a hybrid academic-practitioner viewpoint. From Islamic marriage laws to the ordination of female Anglican clergy, we focus on the concept of belonging (or not) through culture and the use of female-only spaces and organisations. Belonging is an important social motive; the need for acceptance and belonging is a fundamental concept that drives behaviours. Exploring how we belong grants an understanding of how choices are made, both by the individual and the group.

Re-Thinking Gender, Equality and Development: Perspectives from Academia

Edited by Anuradha Tiwary, GD Goenka University, India and Tarakeshwar Gupta, GD Goenka University, India

September 2022 / ISBN: 978-1-64889-290-5
Availability: In stock
270pp. ¦ $78 £61 €72

Since birth, we have been ensnared in a gendered world. Gender is so deeply ingrained in various aspects of our lives, such as social, political, legal, and economic institutions and the related actions, ideas, and aspirations, that it appears natural. As a result of gender-defined roles and experiences, gendered hierarchies get established. It is crucial to re-examine the fundamental issues of gender, equality, and development from a new perspective. In doing so, this volume puts aside what we are accustomed to and challenges some of our most fundamental assumptions and understandings. It analyses gender not as a given but as a feat, not just as the cause but also as a result, and not only as a person but also as a society, in order to expose and critique the processes that create or reassert the inevitability and naturalness of a gendered reality. The book sketches the basic understanding of gender, its construction, perception of gender, the process of identity formation and socialization, and the kind of influence gender has on society. This volume is a comprehensive resource that gives a new perspective on gender as a key organizing factor within society, it unpacks the social construction of knowledge, categories of difference, and structures of power and inequality, from the viewpoints of researchers and academicians. Researchers, teachers, students, and other groups interested in gender studies, sociology, law, history, and languages will find the book refreshingly handy in their inquiry. The book is a collection of narratives, empirical evidence, and opinion papers along with systematic literature reviews around gender, equality and development.

A Girl Can Do: Recognizing and Representing Girlhood

Edited by Tiffany R. Isselhardt, Girl Museum

March 2022 / ISBN: 978-1-64889-406-0
Availability: In stock
272pp. ¦ $84 £66 €72

How do scholars research and interpret marginalized populations, especially those that are seldom recognized as marginalized or whose sources are believed to be rare? Combining intersectional feminism and public history methodologies, ‘A Girl Can Do: Recognizing and Representing Girlhood’ reflects on how girlhood is found, researched, and interpreted in museums, archives, and historic sites. Defining “girl” as “self-identifying females under the age of 21,” ‘A Girl Can Do’ lays the groundwork for understanding girlhood, its constructs, and its marginalization while providing faculty, students, and working professionals with ten case studies on researching and working with girlhood. Contributors include archaeologists, archivists, curators, educators, and historians who demonstrate how adding a girl studies lens fosters greater inclusivity and diversity in our work. Whether studying spatial techniques of marginalization in colonial Peru, the daybooks as records of girlhood in late-nineteenth century Sweden, or collaborating with self-identifying fangirls to produce a pop-up exhibition, the contributors demonstrate the variety of sources and methods that can be used to interpret this oft-overlooked population. Throughout, ‘A Girl Can Do’ petitions for collaborative and creative thinking in how we can reframe and reinterpret our sources – both traditional and overlooked – to shed new light on how girls have contributed to, and provide frames of reference for, human history and culture.

A Girl Can Do: Recognizing and Representing Girlhood

Edited by Tiffany R. Isselhardt, Girl Museum

March 2022 / ISBN: 978-1-64889-405-3
Availability: In stock
272pp. [Color] ¦ $119 £91 €101

How do scholars research and interpret marginalized populations, especially those that are seldom recognized as marginalized or whose sources are believed to be rare? Combining intersectional feminism and public history methodologies, ‘A Girl Can Do: Recognizing and Representing Girlhood’ reflects on how girlhood is found, researched, and interpreted in museums, archives, and historic sites. Defining “girl” as “self-identifying females under the age of 21,” ‘A Girl Can Do’ lays the groundwork for understanding girlhood, its constructs, and its marginalization while providing faculty, students, and working professionals with ten case studies on researching and working with girlhood. Contributors include archaeologists, archivists, curators, educators, and historians who demonstrate how adding a girl studies lens fosters greater inclusivity and diversity in our work. Whether studying spatial techniques of marginalization in colonial Peru, the daybooks as records of girlhood in late-nineteenth century Sweden, or collaborating with self-identifying fangirls to produce a pop-up exhibition, the contributors demonstrate the variety of sources and methods that can be used to interpret this oft-overlooked population. Throughout, ‘A Girl Can Do’ petitions for collaborative and creative thinking in how we can reframe and reinterpret our sources – both traditional and overlooked – to shed new light on how girls have contributed to, and provide frames of reference for, human history and culture.

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