INDEPENDENT PUBLISHER OF BILINGUAL SCHOLARLY BOOKS IN THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

Search

Browse

Anthropology (26) Art (171) Business and Finance (38) Cognitive Science and Psychology (63) Communication and Journalism (50) Economics (116) Education (71) History (168) Human Geography (23) Interdisciplinary (43) Language and Linguistics (178) Law (16) Music Studies (18) Philosophy (222) Political Science and International Relations (127) Sociology (400) Statistics and Quantitative Methods (21) Series in Literary Studies (62) Series in Philosophy (57) Series in Education (49) Series in Sociology (42) Series in World History (31) Series in Politics (30) Bridging Languages and Scholarship (25) Series in Language and Linguistics (25) Cognitive Science and Psychology (20) Series in Philosophy of Religion (20) Series in American History (19) Series in Art (19) Critical Perspectives on Social Science (16) Series in Cinema and Culture (16) Curating and Interpreting Culture (15) Series on the History of Art (14) Series in Anthropology (13) Economics (13) Series in Business and Finance (12) Series in Critical Media Studies (12) Series in Music (12) Series in Performing Arts (9) Philosophy of Personalism (8) Series in Communication (8) Series in Law (8) Series in Economic Methodology (7) Series on Climate Change and Society (7) Classics in Economics (6) Series in Economic Development (6) Women's Studies (6) Philosophy of Forgiveness (5) Series in Built Environment (5) Series in Economic History (5) Series in Philosophy of Science (4) Series in Social Equality and Justice (4) Series on the History of Science (4) Serie en Sociología (3) Series in Contemporary History (3) Series in Creative Writing Studies (3) Series in Design (3) The Interdisciplinary Built Environment (3) Series in Heritage Studies (2) Series in Innovation Studies (2) Serie en Ciencias Políticas (1) Serie en Comunicación y Medios (1) Serie en Entorno Construido (1) Serie en Estudios Culturales (1) Serie En Estudios Literarios (1) Serie en Filosofía (1) Serie en Música (1) Series in Classical Studies (1) Series in Economics of Technological Change (1) Series in Philosophy of Race (1) Series in Urban Studies (1) English Spanish
by Author


Browsing with filters

Subject: History

Random Destiny: How the Vietnam War Draft Lottery Shaped a Generation

Wesley Abney

June 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-196-1
Availability: In stock
262pp. ¦ $60 £49 €56

This book provides a concise but thorough summary of how the selective service system worked from 1965 through 1973, and also demonstrates how this selective process, during a highly unpopular war, steered major life choices of millions of young men seeking deferrals based on education, occupation, marital and family status, sexual orientation, and more. This book explains each category of deferral and its resulting “ripple effect” across society. Putting a human face on these sociological trends, the book also includes a number of brief personal anecdotes from men in each category, told from a remove of 40 years or more, when the lifelong effects of youthful decisions prompted by the draft have become evident. There are few books which address the military draft of the Vietnam years, most notably CHANCE AND CIRCUMSTANCE: The Draft, the War and the Vietnam Generation, by Baskir and Strauss (1978). This early study of draft-age men discusses how they were socially channeled by the selective service system. RANDOM DESTINY follows up on this premise and draws from numerous later studies of men in the lottery pool, to create the definitive portrait of the draft and its long-term personal and social effects. RANDOM DESTINY presents an in-depth explanation of the selective service system in its final years. It also provides a comprehensive yet personal portrait of how the draft and the lottery steered a generation of young lives into many different paths, from combat to conscientious objection, from teaching to prison, from the pulpit to the Canadian border, from public health to gay liberation. It is the only recent book which demonstrates how American military conscription, in the time of an unpopular war, profoundly influenced a generation and a society over the decades that followed.

Cultural Encounters: Cross-disciplinary studies from the Late Middle Ages to the Enlightenment

Edited by Désirée Cappa, Warburg Institute et al.

March 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-381-1
Availability: In stock
182pp. ¦ $57 £41 €46

This collection of essays contributes to the growing field of ‘encounter studies’ within the domain of cultural history. The strength of this work is the multi- and interdisciplinary approach, with papers on a broad range of historical times, places, and subjects. While each essay makes a valuable and original contribution to its relevant field(s), the collection as a whole is an attempt to probe more general questions and issues concerning the productive outcomes of cultural encounters throughout the Late Medieval and Early Modern periods. The collection is divided into three sections organised thematically and chronologically. The first, ‘Encounters with the Past,’ focuses on the reception of classical antiquity in medieval images and texts from France, Italy and the British Isles. The second, ‘Encounters with Religion,’ presents a selection of instances in which political, philosophical and natural philosophical issues arise within inter-religious contexts. The final section, ‘Encounters with Humanity,’ contains essays on early science fiction, political symbolism, and Elizabethan drama theory, all of which deal with the conception and expression of humanity, on both the individual and societal level. This volume’s wide range of topics and methodological approaches makes it an important point of reference for researchers and practitioners within the humanities who have an interest in the (cross-)cultural history of the medieval and Renaissance periods.

Reporting from the Wars 1850 – 2015

The origins and evolution of the war correspondent

Edited by Barry Turner, University of Lincoln et al.

June 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-101-5
Availability: In stock
292pp. ¦ $64 £46 €52

From the foundations of the world’s first great empires to the empires of today, war has preoccupied human civilisation for as many as 4000 years. It has fascinated, horrified, thrilled, confused, inspired and disgusted mankind since records began. Provoking such a huge range of emotions and reactions and fulfilling all the elements of newsworthiness, it is hardly surprising that war makes ‘good’ news. Modern technological advancements, such as the camera and television, brought the brutality of war into the homes and daily lives of the public. No longer a far-away and out-of-sight affair, the public’s ability to ‘see’ what was happening on the frontline changed not only how wars were fought but why they were fought. Even when a war is considered ‘popular,’ the involvement of the press and the weight of public opinion has led to criticisms that have transformed modern warfare almost in equal measure to the changes brought about by weapon technology. War reporting seeks to look beyond the official story, to understand the very nature of conflict whilst acknowledging that it is no longer simply good versus evil. This edited volume presents a unique insight into the work of the war correspondent and battlefield photographer from the earliest days of modern war reporting to the present. It reveals how, influenced by the changing face of modern warfare, the work of the war correspondent has been significantly altered in style, method, and practice. By combining historical analysis with experiences of modern day war reporting, this book provides an important contribution to the understanding of this complicated profession, which will be of interest to journalists, academics, and students, alike.

The Gavel and Sickle: The Supreme Court, Cultural Marxism, and the Assault on Christianity

Anthony Walsh, Boise State University

October 2017 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-300-2
Availability: In stock
258pp. ¦ $61 £50 €58

This book addresses the benefits of Christianity for all, the degradation of our culture since the 1950s, the pernicious effects that cultural Marxism has had on Western cultures, and the loss of religious freedom as the Founders envisioned it due to a number of Supreme Court rulings. We cannot understand the culture war and cultural debasement until we understand cultural Marxism. Cultural Marxism has been "hiding in plain sight" since the 1930s with the immigration to the United States of a cadre of intellectuals from Germany who brought with them the folderol of critical theory, political correctness, gender neutrality, radical feminism, and moral relativism. This intellectual moonshine is designed to weaken family structure and individual morality, and it has worked. The ultimate purpose of cultural Marxism is to destroy Western civilization from within. This goal is clearly and unambiguously stated in their books and articles. In numerous places in these books and articles, cultural Marxists are adamant that if socialism is ever to come to America the two epicenters of Western morality, the family and Christianity, will have to be destroyed by slow, stealthy, and incremental attacks on them. They have been aided in their efforts by anti-Christian rulings by the United States Supreme Court since the 1940s. I do not claim in any sense that the Supreme Court is engaged in a conspiracy with cultural Marxists. Their rulings have been based on a reading of the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment that its authors would not recognize, and have used this clause to eviscerate the Free Exercise Clause—America’s “first freedom.” The Court has purged Christianity from the public square, and in doing so it has unwittingly helped the cultural Marxist agenda by spiritually disarming America.

Better to Reign in Hell, Than Serve In Heaven

Satan's Metamorphosis From a Heavenly Council Member to the Ruler of Pandaemonium

Allan Wright, University of Alberta

July 2017 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-287-6
Availability: In stock
169pp. ¦ $57 £47 €54

In this monograph, I argue that Satan was not perceived as a universal malevolent deity, the embodiment of evil, or the “ruler of Pandemonium” within first century Christian literature or even within second and third century Christian discourses as some scholars have insisted. Instead, for early “Christian” authors, Satan represented a pejorative term used to describe terrestrial, tangible, and concrete social realities, perceived of as adversaries. To reach this conclusion, I explore the narrative character of Satan selectively within the Hebrew Bible, intertestamental literature, Mark, Matthew, Luke, Q, the Book of Revelation, the Nag Hammadi texts, and the Ante-Nicene fathers. I argue that certain scholars’ such as Jeffrey Burton Russell, Miguel A. De La Torre, Albert Hernandez, Peter Stanford, Paul Carus, and Gerd Theissen, homogenized reconstructions of the “New Testament Satan” as the universalized incarnation of evil and that God’s absolute cosmic enemy is absent from early Christian orthodox literature, such as Mark, Matthew, Luke, Q, the Book of Revelation, and certain writings from the Ante-Nicene Fathers. Using Jonathan Z. Smith’s essay Here, There, and Anywhere, I suggest that the cosmic dualist approach to Satan as God’s absolute cosmic enemy resulted from the changing social topography of the early fourth century where Christian “insider” and “outsider” adversaries were diminishing. With these threats fading, early Christians universalized a perceived chaotic cosmic enemy, namely Satan, being influenced by the Gnostic demiurge, who disrupts God’s terrestrial and cosmic order. Therefore, Satan transitioned from a “here,” “insider,” and “there,” “outsider,” threat to a universal “anywhere” threat. This study could be employed as a characterization study, New Testament theory and application for classroom references or research purposes.

EV MDC SSL