Making Strangers: Outsiders, Aliens and Foreigners

Outsiders, Aliens and Foreigners

Edited by Abbes Maazaoui, Lincoln University of Pennsylvania

April 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-324-8
Availability: Forthcoming

Studies on foreignness have increased substantially over the last two decades in response to what has been dubbed the migration/refugee crisis. Yet, they have focused on specific areas such as regions, periods, ethnic groups, and authors. Predicated on the belief that this so-called “twenty-first century problem” is in fact as old as humanity itself, this book analyzes cases based on both long-term historical perspectives and current occurrences from around the world. Bringing together an international group of scholars from Australia, Asia, Europe, and North America, it examines a variety of examples and strategies, mostly from world literatures, ranging from Spain’s failed experience with consolidation as a nation-state-type entity during the Golden Age of Castile, to Shakespeare’s rhetorical subversion of the language of fear and hate, to Mario Rigoni Stern’s random status at the unpredictable Italian-Austrian borders, to Lawrence Durrell’s ambivalent approach to noticing the physically visible other, to the French government’s ongoing criminalization of hospitality, to Sandra Cisneros’s attempt at straddling two countries and cultures while belonging to neither one, to the illusive legal limbo of the DREAMers in the United States. We are not born foreigners; we are made. The purpose of the book is to assert, as denoted by the title, this fundamental premise, that is, the making of strangers is the result of a deliberate and purposeful act that has social, political, and linguistic implications. The ultimate expression of this phenomenon is the compulsive labeling of people along artificial categories such as race, gender, religion, birthplace, or nationality. A corollary purpose of the book is to help shed light worldwide on one of the most pressing issues facing the world today: the place of “the other” amid fear-mongering and unabashedly contemptuous acts and rhetoric toward immigrants, refugees and all those excluded within because of race, gender, national origin, religion and ethnicity. As illustrated by the examples examined in this book, humans have certainly evolved in many areas; dealing with the “other” might not have been one of those. It is hoped that the book encourages reflection on how the arts, and especially world literatures, can help us navigate and think through the ever-present crisis: the place of the “stranger” among us.

The Playbook of Persuasive Reasoning

Everyday Empowerment and Likeability

Gavin F. Hurley, Lasell College

March 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-274-6
Availability: Forthcoming

The Playbook of Persuasive Reasoning: Everyday Empowerment and Likeability provides an inclusive and accessible guide to the strategies of persuasive reasoning, which I argue is the lynchpin to all effective communication, including professional communication. The “playbook” explains numerous eye opening communicative maneuvers that readers of all levels and professions can apply to their lives, empowering their messaging and increasing their social magnetism. The Playbook of Persuasive Reasoning uniquely resists the typical approach to argumentation and persuasion that is often technical (e.g. formal logic handbooks), complex (e.g. handbooks on legal argumentation principles), formally business centered (e.g. Harvard Business Review essays) or science oriented (e.g Cialdini’s Influence: Science and Practice). In sum, The Playbook of Persuasive Reasoning is a down-to-Earth guidebook about effective rhetorical strategizing. It is framed around everyday application, using everyday examples, and embedded in everyday language. Since effective communication is highly sought after trait by international employers, clients, and customers, The Playbook of Persuasive Reasoning is a useful book for professionals. Moreover, academics and students—as public intellectuals—can benefit from learning how to deliver more abstract material in an effective manner: verbally and written. Therefore, my goal is to help professionals and students become better and more likeable communicators. In doing so, the books will help them succeed professionally, socially, and cerebrally. Strategies of cooperative argumentation can facilitate this power—and guide individuals toward more empowered lives.

Networks of International Trade and Investment

Understanding globalization through the lens of network analysis

Sara Gorgoni, University of Greenwich et al.

March 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-065-0
Availability: Forthcoming

The globalisation of industries in recent decades has led to a fundamental change in the way in which production is structured: products are no longer manufactured in their entirety in a single location. Integration of global trade has been accompanied by disintegration of production. This disintegration, or rather fragmentation, of production has resulted in a shift-change in patterns of international trade and investment, with a rise in trade of intermediate goods and a rise in FDI activity. In addition, multinational enterprises (MNEs) play a more focal role in this reorganisation of production, spreading out their manufacturing and supply chain activities globally, resulting in an increase in FDI and intra-firm trade. This international fragmentation of production challenges our ability to understand the international economy. Global value chains is one leading theoretical approach encompassing and trying to make sense of these changes, but scholars point to several limitations of it, most prominently the difficulty of aggregating from firm-level observations to national-level. A crucial aspect is that these changes in trade and FDI patterns have resulted in a more interconnected world economy. Understanding the interdependencies between entities involved in the fragmented production process is essential in order to understand the way production is organised today. Traditional methods and statistical approaches are insufficient to address this challenge. This edited book makes a case for the use of network analysis alongside existing techniques in answering burning questions in the areas of international business and economics, such as whether trade has become more global or regional, and to what extent emerging economies challenge the role of traditional producers in specific industries. The book looks at how the approach and methodologies of network analysis can contribute in explaining international business and economics phenomena, in particular related to international trade and investment. It will provide a comprehensive but accessible explanation of the applications of network analysis applications and some of the most recent methodological advances that can contribute to research in the area of international trade and investment. (provisional and subject to change)

Care and Well-being in Old Age

Investigating older people’s involvement with an ethic of care

Marian Barnes, University of Brighton et al.

February 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-071-1
Availability: Forthcoming

This book seeks to understand what well-being means to older people, and to influence the practice of those who work with older people. Drawing from a broad body of work, this volume challenges normative assumptions of ‘successful’ ageing, particularly as seen through neo-liberal policy constructions of ‘active ageing’. Applying insights of feminist ethics of care, it develops a relational ontology that challenges neo-liberal assumptions of autonomous individualism. Central to the development of an ethical perspective built around the significance of care in all our lives is the understanding that humans are relational beings. Our survival as infants is dependent on the care we receive from others. And for all of us, in particular in older age, there are times when illness, emotional or physical frailty mean that we need the care of others to enable us to deal with everyday life. The book documents original, UK research council-funded research, among academic researchers and an NGO collaborator with a shared commitment to the value of working with older people. Theoretically, it draws from and contributes to literature on critical gerontology which seeks to understand how experiences of ageing are shaped by social, economic, cultural and political contexts. The book also reflects on the applications of its insights to social care practice. It aspires to enable practitioners to reflect on personal aspects of ageing and care and to bridge the gap between the personal and the professional.

Ka Osi Sọ Onye: African Philosophy in the Postmodern Era

Edited by Jonathan Chimakonam, University of Calabar, Nigeria & University of Pretoria, South Africa and Edwin Etieyibo, University of the Witwatersrand

February 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-366-8
Availability: In stock
$67 £50 €57

This collection is about composing thought at the level of modernism and decomposing it at the postmodern level where many cocks might crow with African philosophy as a focal point. It has two parts: part one is titled ‘The Journey of Reason in African Philosophy’, and part two is titled ‘African Philosophy and Postmodern Thinking’. There are seven chapters in both parts. Five of the essays are reprinted here as important selections while nine are completely new essays commissioned for this book. As their titles suggest, in part one, African philosophy is unfolded in the manifestation of reason as embedded in modern thought while in part two, it draws the effect of reason as implicated in the postmodern orientation. While part one strikes at what V. Y. Mudimbe calls the “colonising structure” or the Greco-European logo-phallo-euro-centricism in thought, part two bashes the excesses of modernism and partly valorises postmodernism. In some chapters, modernism is presented as an intellectual version of communalism characterised by the cliché: ‘our people say’. Our thinking is that the voice of reason is not the voice of the people but the voice of an individual. The idea of this book is to open new vistas for the discipline of African philosophy. African philosophy is thus presented as a disagreement discourse. Without rivalry of thoughts, Africa will settle for far less. This gives postmodernism an important place, perhaps deservedly more important than history of philosophy allocates to it. It is that philosophical moment that says ‘philosophers must cease speaking like gods in their hegemonic cultural shrines and begin to converse across borders with one another’. In this conversation, the goal for African philosophers must not be to find final answers but to sustain the conversation which alone can extend human reason to its furthermost reaches.

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