Search

Browse

Anthropology (18) Art (95) Business and Finance (29) Cognitive Science and Psychology (31) Communication and Journalism (26) Economics (104) Education (37) History (80) Human Geography (18) Interdisciplinary (22) Language and Linguistics (87) Law (9) Music Studies (11) Philosophy (145) Political Science and International Relations (76) Sociology (216) Statistics and Quantitative Methods (15) Philosophy (42) Education (29) Sociology (29) Series in Literary Studies (24) Politics (17) Language and Linguistics (15) Art (14) World History (14) Bridging Languages and Scholarship (11) Cognitive Science and Psychology (11) Economics (11) Philosophy of Religion (11) Critical Perspectives on Social Science (10) Anthropology (10) Business and Finance (10) Cinema and Culture (9) Curating and Interpreting Culture (8) Music (8) Series in Critical Media Studies (7) Economic Methodology (7) Law (7) Vernon Classics in Economics (6) Communication (6) History of Art (6) Philosophy of Personalism (5) Series on Climate Change and Society (5) Economic Development (5) Economic History (5) Philosophy of Forgiveness (4) Series in American History (4) Performing Arts (4) History of Science (3) Series in Built Environment (2) Series in Contemporary History (2) Series in Creative Writing Studies (2) Series in Innovation Studies (2) Serie en Filosofía (1) Series in Classical Studies (1) Series in Design (1) Series in Heritage Studies (1) Series in Social Equality and Justice (1) Series in Urban Studies (1) The Interdisciplinary Built Environment (1) Economics of Technological Change (1) English Spanish

Browsing with filters

Series: Vernon Series in Language and Linguistics Vernon Series in Language and Linguistics

Philosophy’s Treason

Studies in Philosophy and Translation

Edited by David Morgan Spitzer, Harrisburg Area Community College

January 2020 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-506-8
Availability: In stock
216pp. ¦ $60 £45 €51

Philosophy’s Treason: Studies in Philosophy and Translation gathers contributions from an international group of scholars at different stages of their careers, bringing together diverse perspectives on translation and philosophy. The volume’s six chapters primarily look towards translation from philosophic perspectives, often taking up issues central to Translation Studies and pursuing them along philosophic lines. By way of historical, logical, and personal reflection, several chapters address broad topics of translation, such as the entanglements of culture, ideology, politics, and history in the translation of philosophic works, the position of Translation Studies within current academic humanities, untranslatability within philosophic texts, and the ways philosophic reflection can enrich thinking on translation. Two more narrowly focused chapters work closely on specific philosophers and their texts to identify important implications for translation in philosophy. In a final “critical postscript” the volume takes a reflexive turn as its own chapters provide starting points for thinking about philosophy and translation in terms of periperformativity. From philosophers critically engaged with translation this volume offers distinct perspectives on a growing field of research on the interdisciplinarity and relationality of Translation Studies and Philosophy. Ranging from historical reflections on the overlap of translation and philosophy to philosophic investigation of questions central to translation to close-readings of translation within important philosophic texts, Philosophy’s Treason serves as a useful guide and model to educators in Translation Studies wishing to illustrate a variety of approaches to topics related to philosophy and translation.

Understanding Political Persuasion: Linguistic and Rhetorical Analysis

Douglas Mark Ponton, University of Catania, Italy

October 2019 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-856-4
Availability: In stock
241pp. ¦ $60 £45 €51

This book builds on the consolidated research field of Political Discourse Analysis and attempts to provide an introduction suitable for adoption amongst a readership wishing to understand some of the principles underlying such research, and above all to appreciate how the tools of discourse analysis might be applied to actual texts. It summarises some of the work that has been done in this field by authorities such as Halliday, Fairclough, Wodak, Chilton, Van Dijk, Martin, Van Leeuwen and others to provide the would-be analyst with practical ideas for their own research. Naturally, this would not be the first time that such a handbook or introductory reference book has been proposed. Fairclough himself recently produced one; however, his work, simply entitled Political Discourse Analysis, inevitably includes theoretical insights from his own research. The beginning analyst can, at times, experience a sense of bewilderment at the mass of theoretical writing in linguistics, in the search for some practical, usable tools. I explain a variety of such tools, demonstrating their usefulness in application to the analysis of a number of political speeches, from different historical periods and diverse social contexts. The author’s hope is that would-be students of political rhetoric, of whatever level and from a variety of research areas, will be able to pick up this book and find tools and techniques that will assist them in actual work on texts. Naturally, it is also hoped that they will be inspired to follow up the suggestions for further reading which they will find in the bibliography.

Contact, Community, and Connections: Current Approaches to Spanish in Multilingual Populations

Edited by Gregory L. Thompson, Brigham Young University and Scott M. Alvord, Brigham Young University

June 2019 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-716-1
Availability: In stock
434pp. ¦ $67 £50 €57

This edited volume provides state of the art research on developing areas of Spanish in contact with other languages. This manuscript is unique in its broad yet coherent approach to the study of Spanish in bilingual contexts by investigating current issues in the field through well-designed research and innovative analyses. In addition, this book concludes with research on how languages in contact are reflected in individuals in educational settings as well as insights on how to teach bilinguals raised in contact with English and Spanish. This manuscript is divided into three major themes that focus on the overall issues of Spanish in bilingual contexts: 1. The first section, titled "Language and Identity," is composed of four chapters that focus on the connection between language and identity in unique settings. 2. The second section of the manuscript is titled "Language and Dialectal Contact" and is composed of six chapters that analyze the dialectal and linguistic changes in languages in contact in a variety of settings. 3. The final section is titled "Language in Educational Settings" and consists of four chapters with a focus on heritage speakers and second language students of Spanish in different classroom settings as well as abroad. This volume contributes original research in these areas in a way so as to fill valuable gaps in the current knowledge in the field especially in the innovative ways of approaching areas such as teaching heritage learners, understanding diachronic and synchronic dialectal and linguistic changes as well as innovations in language use, and how language contributes to the formation of identity.

Onomastics between Sacred and Profane

Edited by Oliviu Felecan, Technical University Of Cluj-Napoca, North University Center Of Baia Mare, Romania

August 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-401-6
Availability: In stock
434pp. ¦ $68 £53 €59

Religiously, God is the creator of everything seen and unseen; thus, one can ascribe to Him the names of His creation as well, at least in their primordial form. In the mentality of ancient Semitic peoples, naming a place or a person meant determining the role or fate of the named entity, as names were considered to be mysteriously connected with the reality they designated. Subsequently, God gave people the freedom to name persons, objects, and places. However, people carried out this act (precisely) in relation to the divinity, either by remaining devoted to the sacred or by growing estranged from it, an attitude that generated profane names. The sacred/profane dichotomy occurs in all the branches of onomastics, such as anthroponymy, toponymy, and ergonymy. It is circumscribed to complex and interdisciplinary analysis which does not rely on language sciences exclusively, but also on theology, ethnology, sociology, psychology, philosophy, anthropology, geography, history and other connected fields, as well as culture in general. Despite the contributors’ cultural diversity (29 researchers from 16 countries – England, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Nigeria, Poland, Romania, Russia, South Africa, Spain, U.S.A., and Zimbabwe – on four continents) and their adherence to different religions and faiths, the studies in Onomastics between Sacred and Profane share a common goal that consist of the analysis of names that reveal a person’s identity and behavior, or the existence, configuration and symbolic nature of a place or an object. One can state that names are tightly connected to the surrounding reality, be it profane or religious, in every geographical area and every historical period, and this phenomenon can still be observed today. The particularity of this book lies in the multicultural and multidisciplinary approach in theory and praxis.

Writing as a Way of Staying Human in a Time that Isn’t

Edited by Nate Mickelson, Guttman Community College, City University of New York (CUNY)

July 2018 / ISBN: 978-1-62273-437-5
Availability: In stock
246pp. ¦ $61 £44 €50

The human element of our work has never been more important. As Robert Yagelski explains in Writing as a Way of Being (2011), the ideological and social pressures of our institutions put us under increasing pressure to sacrifice our humanity in the interest of efficiency. These problems only grow when we artificially separate self/world and mind/body in our teaching and everyday experiences. Following Yagelski and others, Writing as a Way of Staying Human in a Time that Isn't proposes that intentional acts of writing can awaken us to our interconnectedness and to ways in which we—as individuals and in writing communities—might address the social and environmental challenges of our present and future world. Featuring essays drawn from a range of contexts, including college composition and developmental reading and writing, professional and legal writing, middle school English, dissertation projects, academic conferences, and an online writing group, the collection outlines three ways writing can help us stay human: caring for ourselves and others; honoring the times and spaces of writing; and promoting justice. Each essay describes specific strategies for using writing as a means for staying human in inhuman times. The authors integrate personal stories, descriptions of classroom assignments and activities, and current research in writing studies. Their work shows that writing can contribute to personal, social, and political transformation by nurturing vulnerability, compassion, and empathy among students and instructors alike.

EV MDC SSL